05 mai 2017 ~ 0 Commentaire

Accessory Navicular Treatments

Overview

The bones of the foot occasionally develop abnormally in a child and an extra bone called an accessory navicular is present towards the inside of the foot, in front of the ankle. This bone is present in approximately 10% of the general population but not large enough to cause symptoms in the majority of these individuals. The extra bone lump present in childhood can be quite uncomfortable because it rubs on shoes. In addition, the feet associated with the accessory navicular are invariably flat. If the child is active and involved in various athletic activities, this will aggravate the inflammation of the tendon that attaches to the accessory navicular. This tendon is called the posterior tibial tendon and is responsible for maintaining the strength of the arch of the foot. The flat-footedness associated with the accessory navicular usually brings the child for treatment.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

Just having an accessory navicular bone is not necessarily a bad thing. Not all people with these accessory bones have symptoms. Symptoms arise when the accessory navicular is overly large or when an injury disrupts the fibrous tissue between the navicular and the accessory navicular. A very large accessory navicular can cause a bump on the instep that rubs on your shoe causing pain.

Symptoms

The catalyst for symptoms might be some sort of injury (such as a broken or sprained ankle), excessive activity, or irritation from where shoes are rubbing on the bony prominence the accessory navicular makes. These can irritate the bone, or make the tendon it?s embedded in (the posterior tibial tendon, remember?) inflamed and sore. Because the tendon is compromised in its ability to support the arch, accessory navicular syndrome almost always leads to flat feet, which is one very obvious symptom.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis starts by speaking with the patient about symptoms. The physician will look at the foot and examine it for signs of an accessory navicular. By putting pressure on the area, the doctor may determine its presence simply by the presence of pain. The muscle, joint, and the overall structure of the foot may be considered, as well as the way in which the patient walks. If a diagnosis of accessory navicular syndrome is made, an X-ray or MRI may be ordered to confirm diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment

Most children?s symptoms are improved or resolved by taking a break from activities that irritate their feet. Shoe inserts that pad the accessory navicular area are also helpful. If your child?s symptoms do not improve, your physician may recommend a below-the-knee cast or walking boot. Surgery is rarely needed.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

Once the navicular inflammation has lessened it is not necessary to perform surgery unless the foot becomes progressively flatter or continues to be painful. For these children, surgery can completely correct the problem by removing the accessory navicular bone and tightening up the posterior tibial tendon that attaches to the navicular bone. The strength of this tendon is integral to the success of this surgery as well as the arch of the foot. Following surgery the child is able to begin walking on the foot (in a cast) at approximately two weeks. The cast is worn for an additional four weeks. A small soft ankle support brace is then put into the shoe and worn with activities and exercise for a further two months.

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