05 mai 2017 ~ 0 Commentaire

Extra Bone In Foot Accessory Navicular

Overview

Sometimes, feet do weird things. For instance, about 10% of the general population?s feet have decided that having an extra bone in the mix is a really great idea. This extra bone (or sometimes a bit of cartilage), is called an accessory navicular. It shows up in a tendon called the posterior tibial tendon (which is a fancy name – but just remember, it helps support the arch of the foot) on the middle of the inside of the foot, just above the arch. This extra little bone is present from birth, so it?s not something that?ll suddenly grow later in life. Now, accessory navicular syndrome is when that extra bone starts causing issues with your shoe-wearing, or even the shape and function of your foot. It?s the syndrome you want to worry about, not necessarily the extra bone itself.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

Like all painful conditions, ANS has a root cause. The cause could be the accessory navicular bone itself producing irritation from shoes or too much activity. Often, however, it is related to injury of one of the structures that attach to the navicular bone. Structures that attach to the navicular bone include abductor hallucis muscle, plantar calcaneonavicular ligament (spring ligament) parts of the deltoid ligament, posterior tibial tendon.

Symptoms

What precipitates the pain? It will usually be caused by rubbing of the skate or other footwear against the prominence. You?ll commonly see blisters or a red irritated area. Other symptoms to look for, especially when you?re treating an older child or adult, include an area of pain along the posterior tibial tendon of the arch and fatigue of the legs. Typically, these patients are not able to participate in sports for a lengthy period of time or you?ll hear them complain of pain and/or soreness after extended activities. Most individuals with a prominent navicular area will have tried accommodating this area with a doughnut pad or adjustments to their skate.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is fairly simple based on an examination by your doctor. He or she will palpate the navicular bone, and based on the location of pain will suspect an accessory navicular. The doctor will also observe your gait to see if you are flatfooted. At this point an x-ray will make the definitive diagnosis. Other causes of pain in the same area of the foot would include a fracture of the navicular bone or possibly tendonitis or even a partial tear of the tibialis posterior tendon that inserts into the navicular. In these cases there is usually a history of trauma. People with a naturally « large » navicular bone may also develop a bursitis due to chronic shoe pressure.

Non Surgical Treatment

The initial treatment approach for accessory navicular is non-operative. An orthotic may be recommended or the patient may undergo a brief period of casting to rest the foot. For chronic pain, however, the orthopedic surgeon removes the extra bone, a relatively simple surgery with a brief rehabilitation period and a very good success rate.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

In my experience, the Modified Kidner procedure is one of the most reliable operations for reducing arch pain associated with an accessory navicular bone (a.k.a. os tibial externum). You can also use this procedure to treat a prominence at the inner aspect of the arch, which has been caused by an enlarged navicular bone. The most common patients to visit our office with these problems are between the ages of 8 and 15 and are involved in activities like ice skating, ballet and soccer.

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