05 mai 2017 ~ 0 Commentaire

What Is Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Overview

The accessory navicular is an ossicle, or extra bone located medially to the navicular. Depending on the type, or stage, it may be connected to the navicular by a fibrous union, via a type of joint called a synchrondrosis. In those who have this extra bone, it is present at birth, but it starts as soft cartilage and then begins to ossify (turn into bone) at around age nine. Some sources believe that, in about half of those who have it, the bone will fuse to the navicular in late adolescence, but it is not clear that this actually happens.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

Like all painful conditions, ANS has a root cause. The cause could be the accessory navicular bone itself producing irritation from shoes or too much activity. Often, however, it is related to injury of one of the structures that attach to the navicular bone. Structures that attach to the navicular bone include abductor hallucis muscle, plantar calcaneonavicular ligament (spring ligament) parts of the deltoid ligament, posterior tibial tendon.

Symptoms

This painful condition is called accessory navicular syndrome. Accessory navicular syndrome (ANS) can cause significant pain in the mid-foot and arch, especially with activity. Redness and swelling may develop over this bony prominence, as well as extreme sensitivity to pressure. Sometimes people may be unable to wear shoes because the area is too sensitive.

Diagnosis

An initial assessment is an orthopaedic office begins with a thorough history and complete physical exam, including an assessment of the posterior tibial tendon and areas of tenderness. Associated misalignments of the ankle and foot should be noted. Finally, weight-bearing x-rays of the foot will help in making the diagnosis. Sometimes, an MRI may be needed to see if the posterior tibial tendon is involved with the symptoms or getting more clarity on the anatomy of the accessory navicular.

Non Surgical Treatment

The goal of non-surgical treatment for accessory navicular syndrome is to relieve the symptoms. The following may be used. Placing the foot in a cast or removable walking boot allows the affected area to rest and decreases the inflammation. To reduce swelling, a bag of ice covered with a thin towel is applied to the affected area. Do not put ice directly on the skin. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be prescribed. In some cases, oral or injected steroid medications may be used in combination with immobilization to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy may be prescribed, including exercises and treatments to strengthen the muscles and decrease inflammation. The exercises may also help prevent recurrence of the symptoms. Custom orthotic devices that fit into the shoe provide support for the arch, and may play a role in preventing future symptoms. Even after successful treatment, the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome sometimes reappear. When this happens, non-surgical approaches are usually repeated.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

For patients who have failed conservative care or who have had recurrent symptoms, surgery can be considered. Surgical intervention requires an excision of the accessory navicular and reattachment of the posterior tibial tendon to the navicular. Often times, this is the only procedure necessary. However, if there are other deformities such as a flat foot or forefoot that is abducted, other procedures may be required.

Laisser un commentaire

Vous devez être Identifiez-vous poster un commentaire.

Etsionecrivait |
Lebonsurf Acheter une plan... |
Gabrielbonneau |
Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus | Le Blog de Samy
| Leblogdesfilles2015
| Bodymotivation